San Juan Island Honey

SKU sjihoney
$6.00
Out of stock
1
Product Details

We keep about 40 beehives here on San Juan Island and this is their masterpiece. Beautiful liquid sunshine produced by the hardest working members of Ryan Farm. Raw and minimally filtered. Every Tablespoon of our honey contains the nectar of 100,000 flowers and to gather that nectar our bees collectively flew over 2000 miles!

Wondering what the connection between honey and sea salt is? To us they both represent the embodiment of elemental tastes. Honey is the concentrated form of flower nectar, exemplifying nature's sweetness. Salt is the concentrated form of seawater, exemplifying nature's more savory inclinations. And both form unique fingerprints of a time and a place, salt being the fingerprint of one bays mineral composition, and honey being the fingerprint of the floral community in bloom around our farm in June and July.

This is a wildflower honey, made up of nectar from over 30 different species, including blackberry, snowberry, thistle, lavender, mustard, bird's foot, wild rose, clover and more! And the 8.5 oz jar displays all these flowers! The flavor is not overbearing but like a quiet friend who tells the best stories, it is very interesting!

NOTE: All our honey is raw, which means it is not heated above hive temperatures and is only minimally filtered. What this means for the honey is that from the minute we pour it into the jars it has begun the slow, beautiful transformation towards the solid state (i.e. crystallization). So when you order honey from us in Winter or Spring, you may find that the honey is cloudy or already solid. This is the natural state of affairs. We believe that letting honey express itself and being willing to enjoy the different stages of its maturation will make us all happier honey eaters!

Net Wt. 1.5 oz (175,000 flowers), 8.5 oz (1 million flowers)

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Proudly made with love in Friday Harbor, Washington

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